Introducing "COME"

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Introducing "COME"

Postby CoBoz » Mon Dec 09, 2019 2:29 pm

Hello,
Got a new pup, first one in 6 years...quick one, hopefully..my pup is 11 weeks, and I am starting with the dragging of check cord and the "come" command. Most of the time he does good with a "COME" and a quick tap on the check cord and he comes running to me. What is the proper way to do it when he doesn't listen, preoccupied with smells, etc. Keep calling COME and quick jerks till he is back to you or just ONE COME, then keep the jerk/tapping the cord? Thanks.
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby Willie T » Mon Dec 09, 2019 4:57 pm

At eleven weeks in all honesty I would advise you to take a deep breath, slow down and be patient. I would take the check cord off and let him explore. When I wanted him to come I would take a knee and clap my hands and watch him come boiling in and give your come command when he is enroute. Then I would arm him up when he got there and let him know what a good dog he is. The other thing I would do is make sure he can see you and turn your back and walk away which will also likely bring him running. Too much control too young may inhibit his range down the road and leave you wishing you had let him be a puppy and get comfortable with exploring sights and smells. Whether you realize it or not, that little puppies whole world revolves around you right now. Draw on that. Stoke his natural retrieve. Slowly condition him to loud noises and work up to gunfire. Get him around birds.
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby orhunter » Mon Dec 09, 2019 5:19 pm

I’m with Willie on the check cord at 11 weeks. I’d use it like when you’re doing fetch, in a hallway or other confined area, inside probably. Not a full blown check cord, something light. Out in the field where the pup has the option of ignoring the command is a big no no at this time. You need to keep it on a small scale with complete control.
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby CoBoz » Mon Dec 09, 2019 9:13 pm

Thanks for the responses. Unfortunately, where I live, I kinda need him on a check cord so he doesn't bolt across the road, go through the barded wire fence to chase the neighbors cows, etc. He drags around the check cord fine, I just read a few training books promoted here that said to start introducing the COME command by walking around and popping the check cord every now and then...but I can surely wait a few more weeks if thats the best
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby ryanr » Tue Dec 10, 2019 9:34 am

You're doing fine, nothing wrong with a short check cord to be able reel in pup away from danger, etc. What I would do is always be mindful that it's a young pup and should not be expected to be as reliable on commands, particularly with distractions as even an older pup might. Mix in treats with praise for responding to COME, you're teaching now, not really reinforcing. At least not with much pressure. Another thing, with a young pup try not to use a command when you don't think it will be followed like when pup is exploring or sniffing something really interesting or is otherwise distracted. Set your pup up for success in that regard.
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby orhunter » Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:37 am

The pup’s safety comes first. I live in town and a dog is never off leash when walking around the hood. Regarding the pup’s safety, you should be teaching whoa (wupp) during the leash time. The off the check cord was referring to when the pup was off leash out in the field. Pup needs a lot of this in the beginning to develop independence, search, nose, all the stuff that makes a hunting dog. They don’t learn any of that on a check cord.
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby GONEHUNTIN' » Tue Dec 10, 2019 12:58 pm

I always use a CC on pups, an 1/8" woven nylon. You can teach them SOOOO much at that age with a cc with virtually no pressure. Never harshly jerk or drag him. Kneel down ( you're less imposing) and give little tugs every time you say HERE. Later on those little tugs will transfer to gently taps on the electric collar.
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Re: Introducing "COME"

Postby AverageGuy » Tue Dec 10, 2019 5:23 pm

All my pups drag a light homemade check cord of small diameter woven cord and a small snap swivel on the end. Has saved the life of a pup at least once that I recall as it was running towards a large female otter defending her cubs that was also running right at the pup. I ran and got my foot on the cord, scooped up my pup and exited stage left just in time to avert disaster.

Several have given good advice on recall which I will not repeat other that I specifically avoid trying to call the pup while it is engrossed in something alot more interesting than me. I wait until the pup is already looking my way or even headed my way, and not preoccupied with something. At this stage you want to always be the greatest thing ever when the pup arrives in your lap. I only work on recall once or twice each nature walk.
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