range for chukar dog

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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Drahthaar1108 » Thu Feb 20, 2020 7:58 pm

Bruce, Thank You for the tips, makes it sound much more doable.
AG, I have slings on my pump & semi autos ,but my bird guns I don't, been trying to find a gun smith to put the sling swivels on a few double's , have one 410 that has them , but mostly bird hunt with a 20 or 28. agree they help a lot, and the pole helps too. Forrest
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Highlander » Sat Feb 22, 2020 11:48 am

I see many replies here, very interesting ones, are form the guys who live in the chukar country and have extensively hunted the bird.

I have a question for you.

How a dog, which comes form North East grouse/woodcock lines (NAVHDA and JGVH tested) can make a transition from eastern woodlands to the rough open country of the Great Basin so the dog is able to hunt chukars successfully?

I have never hunted in areas like the ones in the photos. I don’t even know what to expect from a dog in that situation even if that dog is long ranging one from rather green, open, flat fields.

I know a good dog should adopt the terrain, but what is that dog never seen anything like that?

I have traveled, hiked, and hitchhiked in the Great Basin, I have never seen anything so vast and terrifyingly beautiful.
I feel that beauty, the vistas, the challenge and solitude is what makes me want to hunt chukars more, but I live in the North East and my dog probably is going to be from that area as well. So if I ever go to hunt chukars I am afraid my dog might end up being useless or in the best case he is gonna have a tough time. Unless there is some way of retraining him.
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Kiger2 » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:06 pm

Highlander,

Think of it this way. When you come out west to hunt chukars and you get out of the car and look at the vastness of country and wonder if your up to it. Your dog gets out the car, pees and Starts hunting.

Your dog will do what ever it his naturally does. I don't believe they see the world in the terms your worried about. I think if anything the dog will be excited about all the new smells.

Most of the guys Ive hunted with over the years come from the Willamette valley. Terrain more like where you live than where the chukars live. Ive never seen a dog behave differently than they did at home.

Cliffs might be the only thing that might be an issue, just keep an eye on there dog the first little bit. And get your dogs feet in shape.

Come on out and have some fun!
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby orhunter » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:12 pm

Given time, your dog will adapt. Dogs are pretty much born with the drive to get out there but in your (and other's) current hunting situation, they adapt to the confined conditions of the big woods. I wondered about this when shopping for a dog out of the midwest (north woods) but no worry what so ever. If they have the physical structure to run, they will.
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Drahthaar1108 » Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:49 pm

I don't worry about my dogs adapting , I worry about me. Forrest
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby greg moyer » Sat Feb 22, 2020 11:27 pm

If you need to worry about your dog jumping off a cliff you might want to think about sticking to pigeons and pen raised birds.
AG why even bother?
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Drahthaar1108 » Sun Feb 23, 2020 8:24 pm

What is the best way to get your dogs feet in shape ? we have no rocks where I live, closest rocks are about 75 miles.
There is a guy at home that bear hunts Idaho every spring, I ask him why his kennel floor was rocks, he said to get the dogs feet tuff , I don't like them ,to hard to keep clean. Forrest
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby AverageGuy » Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:47 pm

Forrest,


Roading on light traffic gravel road.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JStc1Xb5uHA

Another possibility if you have any gravel parking areas around.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKeyfamy2JE
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Sooty42 » Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:22 pm

Walks and short runs on sidewalks and pavement have toughened up my dogs feet well. I live in the city, so hardscape is easy to find. He has yet to have a foot injury (fingers crossed). We have hunted some very rocky stuff. Although we have only done a few multi day hunts on the rocky stuff.
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Highlander » Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:29 pm

Kiger2 wrote:Highlander,

Think of it this way. When you come out west to hunt chukars and you get out of the car and look at the vastness of country and wonder if your up to it. Your dog gets out the car, pees and Starts hunting.

Your dog will do what ever it his naturally does. I don't believe they see the world in the terms your worried about. I think if anything the dog will be excited about all the new smells.

Most of the guys Ive hunted with over the years come from the Willamette valley. Terrain more like where you live than where the chukars live. Ive never seen a dog behave differently than they did at home.

Cliffs might be the only thing that might be an issue, just keep an eye on there dog the first little bit. And get your dogs feet in shape.

Come on out and have some fun!


I guess I agree the dog will adopt the new environment, but it’s not just handling the bird it is also take a pressure from the new situation and have enough endurance to perform well.
I hope to introduce various types of bird to him as much as it physically and logistically possibly.
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Drahthaar1108 » Mon Feb 24, 2020 9:38 pm

Most all our side roads are dirt, all of our field paths are dirt, the side roads that have rock are to short and go to hard surface and to big of a risk. Forrest
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby ryanr » Tue Feb 25, 2020 3:30 pm

greg moyer wrote:If you need to worry about your dog jumping off a cliff you might want to think about sticking to pigeons and pen raised birds.
AG why even bother?


Yeah I wouldn't worry about a bird dog jumping off a cliff but when I lived in NH with my Labrador and he was a young hard charger he jumped a snowshoe hare one winter day up on the mountainside and was in hot pursuit down a slope through the evergreens. In seconds the snowshoe lept off a snow covered boulder that essentially made the slope there into a sheer dropoff I feared the worst. Followed right behind by my dog. They both disappeared from view. I expected to hear a dog crying in pain. Instead I heard barking as I ran to the edge and looked down nearly 15 feet. There was my dog completely stuck up to his chest in snow barking in frustration as the hare continued on. He had slight dinged up shoulder that caused a limp for a bit but otherwise he was good. Thank goodness for the deep snow!
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby orhunter » Tue Feb 25, 2020 8:55 pm

Greg: I always worried about it and tried to avoid hunting the edge. The stuff night mares are made of. Never wanted to see Ellie's imitation of a bug on the windshield.
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby Highlander » Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:30 pm

Excuse me for my ignorance but is this what you all call quartering? (see picture below) I thought it was called zigzags :D

If it so, why is it bad?
I have always been told it is the way to go. I get it will be hard to perform that kind of pattern in woods, but if a dog does it in open areas is it still bad?
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Re: range for chukar dog

Postby orhunter » Tue Feb 25, 2020 11:33 pm

It's bad because the dog isn't using its nose effectively and not covering ground effectively. A dog should locate birds a couple hundred yards away, it shouldn't have to stumble upon them like a lot of flushers. The dog should be working pretty much perpendicular to the wind. Your picture shows walking directly into the wind and sometimes we have to do it but its not ideal. Don't train a dog to what the picture shows, it'll figure out what works best without your intervention. With a large tight S pattern like in the picture, the dog is working wind it already worked. When the dog hits scent, it may do a short S search to locate the center of the scent stream. As the dog works closer, at some point the dog will acquire enough scent to fire the point instinct. A dog should not be trained to point and hold first scent. Dog needs to learn to work scent on its own so the shooter has a good idea where the birds will be for the flush. A dog that points and holds first scent doesn't tell the shoot if the birds are 10 yards out or 200 yards.

One thing I'll do to slow a dog down if they start getting a little wild like young dogs do, is walk with the wind at my back. Dog should run to the front and turn to the side and work into the wind. It should alternate sides, making a series of upside down J movements. When the dog points, simple move over in front of the dog till the wind is blowing directly from you to the dog. That puts the bird directly between the two of you. This is how I hunt pheasants with a cranked up pup. Dogs hate doing this as it goes against their natural instinct to work the wind efficiently.
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