Goose as table fare?

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Goose as table fare

Postby Mrgrnthumb » Mon Jan 23, 2006 8:25 pm

I have found the key to goose as an excellent table fare is not only the receipe but the hang time of the bird. Once you have killed the bird remove the entralls or leave them in your choice. Allow the bird to hang (head up) three or four days in cool temperatures and allow the natural break down of tissue. This helps eliminating toughness. Some individuals I know allow the bird to hang for a longer period of time, up to 7-10 days, depending on temperature. Regardless, this will help eliminate toughness of the bird. Same applies for duck. I personally have a problem if I hang the bird much longer than four days. I generally clean the bird prior to hanging.

Chris

P.S. No warranty expressed or implied, just another view. :wink:
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Postby DrahtsundBraats » Mon Jan 23, 2006 10:33 pm

You brits (or those of such heritage) believe in this letting the game rot-don't understand it and it never worked for me anyway :wink:

Goose is absolutely wonderful but it can't be confused with that farm raised stuff. Breast out the birds-the reat is usually inedible anyway. My favorite recipe is to cube the breast, lightly bread them, quickly sear them in olive oil and then fold them into a Hawaiian sauce (peppers, pineapple, vinegar, etc) and let it simmer untile the meat starts to break down. Serve over wild rice.

Another way is to braise the breasts in a hunter sauce till they start to break apart easily. Seperate out the sauce, add a heaping tablespoon of apricot jam, an ounce of apple brandy and thicken on a low heat. Plate, dress with sauce and serve.

Good stuff.
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Postby KJ » Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:31 pm

I have always made jerky out of my duck and goose but I had some last year that was some of the best meat I've ever eaten, period. I asked the host how he prepared it and it was pretty simple although I haven't tried making it myself. First, marinade the breasted-out strips in milk to draw out the blood. Then, cut thin slices in a criss-cross fashion on the outside of the meat to help it soak up the marinade. Marinade it a couple days in a mixture (not sure of the ratios) of red wine, balsamic vinager, olive oil and minced garlic and onions. The olive oil really helps keep it from drying out by adding the fat that most wild game lacks. Cook it rare on the grill. Excellent!
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Re: Goose as table fare

Postby terryg » Tue Jan 24, 2006 3:09 pm

Mrgrnthumb wrote:I have found the key to goose as an excellent table fare is not only the receipe but the hang time of the bird. Once you have killed the bird remove the entralls or leave them in your choice. Allow the bird to hang (head up) three or four days in cool temperatures and allow the natural break down of tissue. This helps eliminating toughness. Some individuals I know allow the bird to hang for a longer period of time, up to 7-10 days, depending on temperature. Regardless, this will help eliminate toughness of the bird. Same applies for duck. I personally have a problem if I hang the bird much longer than four days. I generally clean the bird prior to hanging.

Chris

P.S. No warranty expressed or implied, just another view. :wink:



you are correct sir but in the age of those that have never gotten meat anywhere but the supermarket, even suggesting wildfowl be cooked rare is disgusting.

hard to blame somebody that was raised with the notion that any red juice coming from fowl denoted "poisonous" fare and soenthing to be shunned religiously. :roll:

if its a store bought chicken i agree 100%.

wild fowl, however, is raised naturally, what is called "free range" now by the ecos. contains no antibiotics, growth hormones, anti virals, and manmade foodstuffs.

the process you are talking about is natural decomp and, provided it is kept below 35 degrees f, poses no threat along with truly enhancing the flavor and tenderness.

they don't kill cows and pigs and have them in the markets the next day either :roll:

they do not need to be hung. a refrigerator kept at 33 degrees works well. throw them on the shelf and split them up before 14 days max. 7-10 is my regular time allotment.

folks will not be able to stop raving about the wonderful table fare let alone gripe about it. they only do this when they are told. :lol: :lol: :lol:

this is providing you cool them down as soon as possible after the hunt and don't carry them to 5 or 6 bars all night bragging about them and showing them off before finnaly pulling them out of your trunk the next morning :wink:

unless you are like me and "the nuge" and your table fare consists mainly of wild game it is hard to know. most never consume enough to become familiar with wild game prep, cooking and serving let alone aficiandos of creamed dove breast with baby spinach or speckle belly goose in a flaming brandy sause. :wink: :wink:
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Geese

Postby bill10979 » Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:57 pm

Thanks for the ideas, Im surprised that D & B hasnt caught on to the aging. Ive tried it and I do beleive that it helps, especially deer meat. I just keep it in the fridge for about 5 days or so and its good to go.
The best steak houses across the country-Sparks NY, Mortons Chicago, Ruths all feature Aged steaks. Ive heard they age up to 2 weeks to where the meat develops a greenish mold, enzymes help create a super tender cut-so they say.
My issue isnt the toughness. I think geese overall is a fine cut of meat. Its just the flavor. Just gamey and crappy. I have not tried the milk marinade for geese, I do for deer and it works great. i might try some one more time this weekend and then I give up-its jerky or dog food. Ill report back.
The fryer sounds like a good one too-so there might be hope. Best turkey I ever had came deep fried. It was just awesome.
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Postby Mrgrnthumb » Sat Jan 28, 2006 7:46 pm

I just got back from a Mississippi duck hunt and have not been on the board. Hunting was okay, not great. However, my young Griffon who has been timid in water made three very nice retrieves, one being a speckle. At first she wasn't sure how to handle the large bird but figured it out.
In reference to hanging time :wink: I agree with Terry, cook rare or about about 140 degrees.

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Postby KY Duck Hunter » Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:58 pm

We usually just make lots of jerky. I haven't tried roasting a goose in a few years. I probably need to give it a nother go since I have gotten a lot better with turkeys.

Still, for my money in the bird dept, nothing beats doves on the grill.
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Postby Rick Hall » Fri Feb 10, 2006 9:13 am

If this displaced hillbilly is cooking, their breasts are grilled medium rare. Overcook and you may as well eat sun-dried liver. Stop while they're still pink in the middle and it tastes like steak. Doesn't hurt to "butterfly" a pocket for some jalopenea or sweet banana pepper and cream or pepper jack cheese and wrap with bacon.

If you have to have your goose well-done, at least use a browning bag to hold moisture in if roasting. Cajuns here gumbo or pot roast their geese, both of which are super. I'm no Cajun cook but will share what I think a great roasting tip learned from the best:

Holding the knife so it will be flat against the ribs, cut pockets, front to rear, on each side of the breast bone, between the ribs and breast meat. Then stuff each pocket with a mix of chopped bacon (or fatty sausage), onions, celery, bell peppers (the "Cajun Trinity"), your choice of seasonings and Kitchen Bouquet. Unlike stuffing the bird's body cavity, the juices rendered from the stuffing mix by cooking will then baste and season the breast meat from within before winding up in the gravy.

Some won't find it painful to do the roasting breast down in cheap red wine, either.
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Re:

Postby Joe C. » Tue Oct 19, 2010 5:27 am

El General wrote:goose fajitas are good. Try soaking the breasts in salted ice water over night after you shoot them. That will help bleed them and you will get rid of some of the gaminess.

For goose fajitas, marinate the whole breasts overnight in ample amounts of Wishbone Italian salad dressing, lime juice, and the seaonall type seasoning of your choice.


I would avoid using anything acidic, (lime juice), in the marinade as it actually cooks the meat while it marinates. It can make the meat mealy and give it a bad taste if marinated overnight.
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Re: Goose as table fare?

Postby Joe C. » Tue Oct 19, 2010 5:41 am

As chef Scott Leysath, (of Ducks Unlimited TV fame), says... "If you want to roast a goose such as a Christmas Goose, go to the grocery store and buy one". The store bought variety is a completely different bird. There are two ways to cook goose... Hot & Fast, or Low & Slow. I've done them in the crock pot just as you would a Yankee Pot Roast with carrots, potatoes, & onions. You almost can't screw this one up! I only use the boneless skinless breasts for this and save the other parts of the bird for another recipe. The smell can be strong for the first few hours of cooking, (I cook them for about 24 hours - adding water/ stock if needed), but is not indicitive of the finished product. I've had several people tell me they wouldn't have known it was goose if I hadn't told them.

As for the gumbo Rick Hall mentioned... I've never tried them this way but have done so with wood ducks and it was nothing short of awesome! I'm sure goose would be much the same. :D
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Re: Goose as table fare?

Postby tbaier74 » Sun Oct 24, 2010 1:20 pm

I stumbled upon Hank Shaw's "Hunter Angler Gardener Cook" blog a couple of months back. I liked what I read and decided to email Hank to ask for assistance in my upcoming Thanksgiving Day feast. Hank replied and the email correspondence culminated in a face to face meeting in Billings. Hank was on his way to hunt NoDak and Canada. I have tried a number of his recipes and tips...all of them have turned out well. He recently posted his take on the Canada Goose.....here it is:

http://honest-food.net/2010/10/11/cooking-my-goose/

Please spend some time on his site. I'm sure you will find something you like.
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Re: Goose as table fare?

Postby Joe C. » Tue Oct 26, 2010 5:40 am

tbaier74 wrote:I stumbled upon Hank Shaw's "Hunter Angler Gardener Cook" blog a couple of months back. I liked what I read and decided to email Hank to ask for assistance in my upcoming Thanksgiving Day feast. Hank replied and the email correspondence culminated in a face to face meeting in Billings. Hank was on his way to hunt NoDak and Canada. I have tried a number of his recipes and tips...all of them have turned out well. He recently posted his take on the Canada Goose.....here it is:

http://honest-food.net/2010/10/11/cooking-my-goose/

Please spend some time on his site. I'm sure you will find something you like.


That's a great website. Found it not too long ago myself :D
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Re: Goose as table fare?

Postby NDDD » Sat Apr 02, 2011 12:02 pm

This recipe is the bomb! Delicious.

These sausages would be perfect with a cassoulet, with beans, or simply pan-roasted or grilled. The possibilities are unlimited. Note that the only ingredient measured in grams is the salt — it is that important to get the saltiness right. I did include a rougher measurement to get you close, if you don’t have a scale.

Makes about 4 pounds, or 16 sausages.

Prep Time: 90 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

* 3 pounds duck meat or goose meat
* 1 pound pork fat
* 1/2 cup red wine, chilled
* 1 teaspoon Chinese five spice powder
* 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
* 2 teaspoons ground juniper berries
* 2 teaspoons caraway seed
* 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
* 34 grams, or 2 level tablespoons, kosher salt
* hog casings

1. Chop the meat and fat into about 1-inch chunks, then mix all the spices together and toss with the meat and fat. Chill the meat and fat until it is almost frozen by putting it in the freezer for an hour or so.
2. Take out some hog casings and set in a bowl of very warm water.
3. Grind the meat and fat through your meat grinder (you can use a food processor in a pinch, but you will not get a fine texture) using the coarse die. If your room is warm, set the bowl for the ground meat into another bowl of ice to keep it cold.
4. Add the wine and mix thoroughly either using a Kitchenaid on low for 60-90 seconds or with your (very clean) hands. This is important to get the sausage to bind properly.
5. Stuff the sausage into the casings all at once. Twist off links by pinching the sausage down and twisting it, first in one direction, and then with the next link, the other direction. Or you could tie them off with butcher’s string.
6. Hang the sausages in a cool place for 1 hour if it is warm out, up to overnight if you have a place that will get no warmer that 45 degrees. The longer you can hang the sausages, the better they will taste. After they have dried a bit, put in the fridge until needed. They will keep for at least a week. If you are freezing the sausages, wait a day before doing so. This will tighten up the sausages and help them keep their shape in the deep-freeze.
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Re: Goose as table fare?

Postby NDDD » Sat Apr 02, 2011 12:17 pm

Here is another one that I really enjoy. Use for duck and goose. Young birds that aren't shot up, and are plucked. I do this at Thanksgiving. I smoke them for 6 hours at 250 degrees. Apple wood is best.



Brine Method for Turkey, Duck, Goose or Chicken

Prep Time: 12–14 Hours




Comment:

Brining is a pretreatment in which the Goose is placed in a salt water solution known as brine. This produces a moist and well-seasoned bird. Normally, meat loses about 30 percent of its weight during cooking, but if you brine the meat first, you can reduce the moisture loss by as little as 15 percent. Additionally, brining enhances juiciness. The muscle fibers absorb the flavored liquid during the brining period. Some of this liquid will get lost during cooking, but since the meat is in a sense more juicy at the start of cooking, it ends up much juicier and flavorful. I recommend brining in two plastic trash bags, one inside the other, to hold the turkey and brine. I then place the bags in a large metal or ceramic bowl. Once the brine is added, I seal the bag with a wire tie and place in the bottom of a refrigerator, shaking the bag every couple hours. You may also place the bird in a small ice chest, breast down, covering with the brine. If using the ice chest method, chill the brine to approximately 40°F, and then add 5–6 ice packs to maintain temperature overnight. A smaller bird works best when brining.

Ingredients:

* 1 (12–14 pound) turkey or other fowl
* 2 gallons cold water
* 1 cup kosher salt or 2 cups table salt
* ½ cup brown sugar
* 4 bay leaves, crushed
* 1 tbsp dried thyme
* 1 tbsp dried basil
* 1 tbsp dried sage
* 2 tbsps granulated garlic
* 2 tbsps black pepper

Then smoke bird with apple wood for 6 hrs. at 250 degrees. Fabulous table fare.
"A man may not care for golf and still be human, but the man who does not like to see, hunt, photograph or otherwise outwit birds or animals is hardly normal. He is supercivilized, and I for one do not know how to deal with him." ~ Aldo Leopold
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Re: Goose as table fare?

Postby jarbo03 » Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:28 pm

IMO, goose is one of the best wild game meats you can eat. Don't give up on it, took me years to learn how to cook it, Scott Leysath changed my opinions on the fowl. As said before cook to no more than 140 deg., I take mine off the grill around 135 deg and let sit for 10 minutes. I also make jerky, really good stuff. I slice the breast lengthwise about 3/16" thick, season with cure and whatever flavor you like, let sit for a day then put on dehydrator for 10 hours. Makes a great snack for the blind bag or shell vest. While cleaning birds keep the tender ones for grilling and jerky the rest.
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