Free Feeding Question

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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby hicntry » Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:09 am

I free fed 25 to 30 adult dogs for close to 30 years. The dogs were dominate and animal aggressive. Never had any fights over food free feeding. Never had any fat dogs. Rarely there would be a food guarderwhich I solved right off with another piece of rocket science.....I put a second feeder at the other end of the yard and they stopped guarding. I did find a way to increase their longevity by 3 to 4 years. That is what? 1/3 longer lifespan? How? I quit taking them to the vet after the first 10 years. I had enough dogs and had them long enough to TRUMP most tests today. Raised over 200 litters free feeding and none of the dogs EVER found it necessary to gulp food like it may be their last meal. Free feeding is a lot like inbreeding.....everyone knows all about it but have never done it.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby AverageGuy » Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:30 am

I free fed hounds and birddogs for the first 20+ years I had dogs and it worked just fine. Never had a fat dog yet and they lived long and healthy lives. But when I started traveling for days and weeks at a time to hunt far from home, I switched away from Free Feeding so the dog was conditioned to eat quickly and get some needed rest. I find the question to be like many subjects - it depends ...
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby hicntry » Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:50 am

Here is a picture of one of the worst food guarders that I encountered in all those years.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/ ... 48copy.jpg
Ignorance can be fixed but stupid is forever.
Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible IF you don't know what you are talking about.

"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Jim Beam in one hand, Airedale in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby STait » Fri Jun 15, 2018 1:50 pm

hicntry wrote:Here is a picture of one of the worst food guarders that I encountered in all those years.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v401/ ... 48copy.jpg


Bwahahaha! Good one!
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby JONOV » Fri Jun 15, 2018 2:10 pm

Wrong Post.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby JONOV » Fri Jun 15, 2018 2:47 pm

Hunters Edge wrote:Not only does the study show health issues later in the dogs life but shortens the dogs life. Which we all should be trying to extend that time we can share with them.
Read the study carefully and think critically. What is the difference between free feeding, and not limiting their volume during their 15 minute feeding period? And, what did the study indicate caused the shortened lifespan and health concerns?

Hunters Edge wrote:What also I would like to point out deep chested dogs should not eat 2 hours before or after heavy excersize to minimize twisted gut. I do not want to debate this, several articles/data point to this others not. I prefer to way on caution especially when hunting often times we are not close to a veterinary service or closed on weekends.
Having lost a family dog to bloat, I have to agree with you on that point. And I can't help but wonder if it was because, in his Golden Retrieverly way, he destroyed his ration in 49 seconds.

Hunters Edge wrote:In the end you do what you want, just be prepared to pay the consequences. I have multiple dogs and just fed them in separate rooms to prevent fighting. It is also a great training for steady by blind and retrieves (even though they are not retrieving).

Dogs sit and carry dishes, call one dog as the others sit, close door in M bathroom, call next dog close M bedroom, call the next in bathroom close door etc.

In the field in each kennel, which you may have portable kennels in basement or laundry room would work as well.

By separating it stops any fighting before it happens or eliminates the catastrophe. Next being separated also they eat the food at the rate each dog is comfortable at just pick up food dish in15 minutes.

I will not advise self feed for multiple reasons, and do not believe anyone should advocate it to others for those same reasons.

You're missing that my goal is to get this dog from stray or owner surrender or taken by animal control, to a pet that can live with whoever I send it to.
Dogs with resource guarding problems, aggression of any kind, are highly likely to get returned. That, and severe anxiety and destructiveness.
I have to assume that whoever gets these dogs, is looking for the dog that Jojo the Bachelorette hashttps://www.google.com/search?q=Jojo+bachelorette+dog&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjl6LmOtdbbAhVP0FMKHQ5mCBkQ_AUICigB&biw=1280&bih=918#imgrc=uAc5GpQlAbsVgM: without the hassles of a puppy or a severely misplaced sense of guilt they have buying from a breeder.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby JONOV » Fri Jun 15, 2018 2:55 pm

AverageGuy wrote:I free fed hounds and birddogs for the first 20+ years I had dogs and it worked just fine. Never had a fat dog yet and they lived long and healthy lives. But when I started traveling for days and weeks at a time to hunt far from home, I switched away from Free Feeding so the dog was conditioned to eat quickly and get some needed rest. I find the question to be like many subjects - it depends ...

Yeah, and I do the same on a hunting trip. And, I do take it up the night before we hunt. If I achieve a station in life that allows me to hunt like you seem to I'd go to the same setup.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby flitecontrol » Fri Jun 15, 2018 5:02 pm

When the dog and I are hunting away from home, at the end of the day, neither one of us has any problem with eating or resting. I eat more than normal because I've expended more energy than normal. I think it's the same way for the dog. How long does it take him to eat what he's going to eat? I don't know as I don't stay up to monitor his intake. I don't ever recall a dog that was sluggish in the morning due to a gut full of food. Does it really matter whether or not he eats in 15 minutes, or two hours?
I've had several really good dogs, but none were perfect. Neither am I, so keep that in mind!
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby AverageGuy » Fri Jun 15, 2018 5:09 pm

flitecontrol wrote:When the dog and I are hunting away from home, at the end of the day, neither one of us has any problem with eating or resting. I eat more than normal because I've expended more energy than normal. I think it's the same way for the dog. How long does it take him to eat what he's going to eat? I don't know as I don't stay up to monitor his intake. I don't ever recall a dog that was sluggish in the morning due to a gut full of food. Does it really matter whether or not he eats in 15 minutes, or two hours?


Yes it matters alot if you roll in after dark and need to get the dog fed and back into its kennel in the back of the truck. Not everywhere I stay out on the road am I able to keep my dog in the room with me. It might not concern you but I want to know when I go to hunt my dog the next morning he has not just filled up his belly and is much more prone to roll his stomach because of it.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby flitecontrol » Fri Jun 15, 2018 5:48 pm

I had a dog that developed stomach torsion twice while visiting my in-laws. Because there would be fights over food with their dogs, he was fed in the truck camper at night. Because the vet was sure suturing the stomach to the abdominal wall after the first episode would keep it from twisting, he didn't believe it was torsion the second time, and the dog died. I took his body to a vet school to determine the cause of death. Both times, it was in the evening after he was put up and fed. Five of the eight dogs from his litter developed torsion, and the dam died in her kennel while her owner was away and a neighbor was caring for the dog. The owner suspected torsion but didn't have a necropsy performed. Torsion can happen pretty much anytime, anywhere. It doesn't require exercise on a full stomach.

It would be helpful to know whether gradual feeding over time or a gut full of food was better or worse for developing torsion. Neither one of us is likely to change their view on the subject, but that would be good info to have.

If a dog develops torsion, insist that the attending vet fistulate the dog. That is, make a hole in the stomach and abdominal wall (fistula) and suture them together. When it heals, the stomach is fused to the wall and it cannot twist.
I've had several really good dogs, but none were perfect. Neither am I, so keep that in mind!
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby AverageGuy » Fri Jun 15, 2018 6:08 pm

Yes I am sure a line of dogs with genetic defects are more prone at any time. I have done both, and have valid reasons for the approach I am using now. They will ring true with some and not with others.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby hicntry » Fri Jun 15, 2018 6:35 pm

I have no idea what causes torsion, but, out of the hundreds of dogs I have free fed, none has ever had it. Being big terriers, they were very active to boot.
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"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Jim Beam in one hand, Airedale in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby Calvinator » Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:08 pm

I have never free fed any dog, nor do I plan to do so. Hicntry, I have respect for your program and have seen at least one of your Airedales(not raised by you). However, feeding a dog specific amounts on a somewhat scheduled routine can be beneficial for house training. Additionally a dog that goes off feed will be recognized quicker and may be the first sign that there is something wrong with the dog.
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Re: Free Feeding Question

Postby hicntry » Sun Jun 17, 2018 9:34 pm

Calvinator wrote:I have never free fed any dog, nor do I plan to do so. Hicntry, I have respect for your program and have seen at least one of your Airedales(not raised by you). However, feeding a dog specific amounts on a somewhat scheduled routine can be beneficial for house training. Additionally a dog that goes off feed will be recognized quicker and may be the first sign that there is something wrong with the dog.


I respect that Calvin, but, I very, very, very seldom have a puppy have an accident in the house because I simply don't raise them like most people.....and I NEVER crate them. Pups spent their first night in the house on a dog bed and never had an "accident". So, I don't see where free feeding is a problem. As far as a dog having a problem, I watch the dogs close and could always tell if something wasn't quite right
Ignorance can be fixed but stupid is forever.
Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible IF you don't know what you are talking about.

"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Jim Beam in one hand, Airedale in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"
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