CRP

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CRP

Postby AverageGuy » Thu Jan 19, 2017 7:46 pm

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Re: CRP

Postby AverageGuy » Sat Jan 21, 2017 10:06 am

I think it is a shame when a political post gets 270 reads while a post about one of the most critical subjects to rearing and hunting upland game birds in the US gets only a third of that volume of interest. I hope bird hunters will weigh in and let their members in Congress know their views.

Cannot imagine anyone who hunts pheasants not wanting their tax dollars to fund more CRP. Or anyone who drinks water.
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Re: CRP

Postby Bigearl » Sat Jan 21, 2017 11:34 am

Lower the payout incentive per acre. More acres can be allowed in the program for the same amount or even less money.
The payouts per acre are to high anyway. $100-150 and in some rare cases $300 per acre. That's just ridiculous!
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Re: CRP

Postby AverageGuy » Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:29 pm

Perhaps.

The rates are set to be competitive with the income streams that could be had through haying, cattle or row crop as the alternative uses if the land is not in CRP. At $150 per acre the return on the investment for most land prices is 3 to 6% so not like it makes your socks roll up and down.
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Re: CRP

Postby Bruce Schwartz » Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:30 pm

Bigearl wrote:Lower the payout incentive per acre. More acres can be allowed in the program for the same amount or even less money.
The payouts per acre are to high anyway. $100-150 and in some rare cases $300 per acre. That's just ridiculous!


Well, according to what I found on the internet, the average CRP land rental rate in the U.S. in 2015 was about $70 per acre, with an average of $51 per acre on General CRP acres, $114 per acre on Continuous CRP acres and $144 per acre on CREP acres.

CRP is a federal program that takes land sensitive to erosion out of farm production and puts it aside for a period of years (usually 10-15) and the government pays the landowner for doing so. The CCRP (continuous CRP) program is within the CRP and targets the highest risk lands and CREP acres have to do with riparian habitat land). The amount of land that's allowed in the CRP program was 37 million acres but has been reduced to 24 million acres in 2016 resulting in a savings of 3.3 billion dollars.

The CRP program is in the Farm Bill which is voted on every five years and the bill is scheduled to come up in 2018 but lots of it will be figured out this year. Lots of non-agriculture programs are in it like food stamps, nutrition, etc. so given the current climate it's hard to say what will happen.

Yes, sign the petition. The CRP program helps protect land from some adverse farming practices and provides habitat for wildlife.
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Re: CRP

Postby GONEHUNTIN' » Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:46 pm

I love CRP but the one thing troubling to me about it, is that the ranchers-farmers are allowed to mow it and still get paid for the land. Double dipping. I don't know when they're allowed to mow, but it irritates the heck out of me when I go to hunt a piece of land and it's mowed. Seems to me it has to be one way or the other; get paid for not ranching it or ranch it and not get paid.
I just hate seeing birds die of natural causes unless I'm that natural cause.
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Re: CRP

Postby GONEHUNTIN' » Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:46 pm

I love CRP but the one thing troubling to me about it, is that the ranchers-farmers are allowed to mow it and still get paid for the land. Double dipping. I don't know when they're allowed to mow, but it irritates the heck out of me when I go to hunt a piece of land and it's mowed. Seems to me it has to be one way or the other; get paid for not ranching it or ranch it and not get paid.
I just hate seeing birds die of natural causes unless I'm that natural cause.
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Re: CRP

Postby AverageGuy » Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:52 pm

I hear it said a lot that the landowners are getting paid to do nothing. That is wrong.

I spent $5K to fix some erosion ditches when I first bought my current farm, another $7K spreading lime to bring the PH up, more thousands than I will admit to here to buy farm equipment to plant food plots, establish and maintain fire breaks and disk some ground to create bare ground and weeds for turkey, pheasant and quail poults/chicks. I spent approx $3K planting my food plots in 2016 (the wife can tell me exactly but I don't ask). I will start burning some fields soon and will hire help when I do it.

Just trying to give some pertinent information on the reality of the program. Done right the landowner does a lot of things both sweat and equity to properly maintain the CRP acreages and hopefully yield the intended soil. water and wildlife benefits.

And yes, as Bruce mentions the Farm Programs are unfortunately lumped in with Welfare. It is so unfortunate that it is. Would love to change it.
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Re: CRP

Postby GONEHUNTIN' » Sat Jan 21, 2017 2:08 pm

I have never seen CRP land that has had ANY maintainance done on it in SD. It's all simply laid fallow for years. On one piece I hunt, when they mow it, they even mow and bale the three small potholes on it. Are you saying that to get the money, there is supposed to be IMPROVEMENTS done on the property?
I just hate seeing birds die of natural causes unless I'm that natural cause.
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Re: CRP

Postby jlw034 » Sat Jan 21, 2017 2:21 pm

GONEHUNTIN' wrote:I have never seen CRP land that has had ANY maintainance done on it in SD. It's all simply laid fallow for years. On one piece I hunt, when they mow it, they even mow and bale the three small potholes on it. Are you saying that to get the money, there is supposed to be IMPROVEMENTS done on the property?


Ummmmmm are you using your eyes?
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Re: CRP

Postby Kiger2 » Sat Jan 21, 2017 4:07 pm

The reality is that the government is not paying for the program. The taxpayers are.
Wonder what all of your thoughts are that?
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Re: CRP

Postby JASmith » Sat Jan 21, 2017 4:08 pm

Having recently researched enrolling some land into CRP, it's not very lucrative at all. You are lucky if it pays the property tax in some areas.

You are being paid NOT to develop or farm it, you are not being paid for 'doing nothing'. That said, you do have to ensure the basic requirements of CRP enrollment are kept constant as AG said... and that can be expensive.

I ended up not enrolling. Wasn't worth the time and effort to get done. If you want more CRP, up the payout and reduce the red tape.

I like Kiger2's take on it though. :)
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Re: CRP

Postby GONEHUNTIN' » Sat Jan 21, 2017 4:57 pm

jlw034 wrote:
GONEHUNTIN' wrote:I have never seen CRP land that has had ANY maintainance done on it in SD. It's all simply laid fallow for years. On one piece I hunt, when they mow it, they even mow and bale the three small potholes on it. Are you saying that to get the money, there is supposed to be IMPROVEMENTS done on the property?


Ummmmmm are you using your eyes?


All CRP that I hunt is merely fallow land. Yes, I use my eyes. With the minimal payments made on CRP, I doubt any landowner could do improvements on it. I can't think of a single piece of CRP I have seen in SD that the land owner has improved. I'd like to see one somewhere. Lots of improved WPA'S but, CRP?
I just hate seeing birds die of natural causes unless I'm that natural cause.
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Re: CRP

Postby jlw034 » Sat Jan 21, 2017 5:14 pm

GONEHUNTIN' wrote:
jlw034 wrote:
GONEHUNTIN' wrote:I have never seen CRP land that has had ANY maintainance done on it in SD. It's all simply laid fallow for years. On one piece I hunt, when they mow it, they even mow and bale the three small potholes on it. Are you saying that to get the money, there is supposed to be IMPROVEMENTS done on the property?


Ummmmmm are you using your eyes?


All CRP that I hunt is merely fallow land. Yes, I use my eyes. With the minimal payments made on CRP, I doubt any landowner could do improvements on it. I can't think of a single piece of CRP I have seen in SD that the land owner has improved. I'd like to see one somewhere. Lots of improved WPA'S but, CRP?


I do get your point, and maybe I spend more time in SD than you (no idea where you live), but I've been able to hunt on several pieces that have some sort of active improvement done. I've even volunteered to help spray and plant trees on one. It is a wonderful 80 acres, more primed for big bucks, but it does hold birds.

But to your point, I've hunted on many more that are au naturale, so to speak.
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Re: CRP

Postby Bruce Schwartz » Sat Jan 21, 2017 5:45 pm

It may vary all over, but in chukar/quail/hun areas here in the West most birds avoid CRP as it's too thick for chicks to find bugs and move freely around in it and not there's not enough diversity in what's planted. As the grass stands age they get stale and it's better for them to be mowed or grazed once in a while in order to thin it out. And the CRP program allows that in certain instances, as well as allowing herbicides for some problem weeds.

I have some acres in CREP (CRP for riparian areas) and I had to make numerous brush piles, shrub plantings, and provide fencing in order to qualify. The expenses for those improvements were cost-shared with the government. I have other areas eligible for CRP but the program doesn't allow me enough freedom to do the restoration of native grasses and plants that I would like.

The CRP program protects marginal land from poor farming practices and that makes it worth the tax dollars IMO.
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