Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby ryanr » Wed Jan 25, 2017 12:49 am

3drahthaars wrote:
ryanr wrote:
overit2 wrote:Dang, I guess I won't know what to expect at my first training day w/a new 20 week old Weim pup then huh? lol

Whispers behind my back, eyeballing, whispers? ;)


Average Guy gave great advice. NAVHDA folks are good people by and large, introduce yourself and your pup (we love meeting new pups.) Only thing I'll add is just don't be the person that let's their dog run free when you get there. Generally, unless the dog is actually being trained at the moment, all dogs at NAVHDA events should be leashed or crated. Typically after a dog has a training run the handler will put it back up in its crate in their vehicle and then go help out training the next dog and so on.

At our chapter trainings, we have a requirement that anyone going into the field for bird work must have a flourescent orange vest & hat, in accordance with our state Game Commission's regs. So having a fluorescent orange vest & hat already in your vehicle is a good idea. Bring plenty of water for you and your pup as well and maybe snacks and lunch if you want. Have a good attitude & willingness to help, observe & ask questions and have FUN.


Had to comment on your statement... ;)

We had some NAVHDA guys from up north do a training clinic, I think it was for FF.

They about ruptured a coronary when they arrived and we dropped the tailgates and let 20 dogs loose! They pretty much said exactly what you posted.

Now, our club is a hunting club with a lot of NAVHDA, VDD, and pointer guys and we all hunt together. It's nothing to have 20 dogs on the ground.

The romp, clean out, play and then training begins, and they know the game. We need to know that they get along, and if not which ones have issues, because North Dakota is a long way from home to find out your dogs don't get along well.

I suppose to each his own. And, most important to observe the "house rules" at the first meeting.

It just tickled me to see that in writing, because we thought it was interesting that it caused such a stir.

3ds


Uh please don't misunderstand me, we often do the same thing you described, letting a number of dogs run the field together to burn some energy up & socialize. Especially first thing in the morning after a drive to the training grounds. I'm basically talking about letting your dog just wander free in the parking area DURING training or as everyone is gathering to receive the day's instructions/training agenda. There's nothing more annoying than having some inattentive handler's dog pestering your dog as the both of you are trying to get ready for your training run. That's what I'm mostly talking about.
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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby ryanr » Wed Jan 25, 2017 1:09 am

overit2 wrote:
GONEHUNTIN' wrote:And that was just your kids. Wait until he sees a squirrel, rabbit, or cat in the yard. These dogs are not normal dog's. I'm sure your view of the ecollar will change very quickly. It is THE easiest way to gain control of a dog in all circumstances and at all distances. And it is NOT brutal, it is added in small increments.


YES, this is exactly what I was thinking. Yep...I know the day is coming.

What age does conditioning start typically ? I agree, if used correctly it is not brutal and can be essential in saving his life (and my pride lol).


Gonehunting gave you a good idea on initial collar conditioning. If I recall my breeder wanted me to try to wait until he was close to a year old. Suffice it to say we definitely did not make it past 6 months before he had it on. However before that my pup always had a check cord on to drag around outside (a real check cord, not a leash) and many guys will use a shorter length "tab" attached to the collar when the pup is in the house. One thing to remember is DON'T give a command you cannot immediately enforce, you'll just teach that little devil your commands don't need to be obeyed (and that will likely cause bigger issues down the road.) He needs to learn that you are the law, the absolute leader and you are fair but FIRM in your commands & expectations. If he does disobey your recall command like that or otherwise take off running, don't chase him. To him it becomes a game and he'll keep doing it. Instead, either ignore him and walk the other way OR don't underestimate the power of calmly but relentlessly walking him down. You're not chasing him, caring his name over and over. You're just walking after him, no matter how long it takes. Eventually he'll give in and stop running away from you. Leash him up and return home.
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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby Dmog » Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:52 am

I like to hunt and I love to hunt with my dog. My dog loves to go fishing with me. He even watches hunting and fishing shows and dreams big dreams just like me. I love dogs and my "hunting" dog is part of my family. I get to wear many hats...career, dad, husband, son, friend and etc. My hunting gets worked in as well as my fishing, reading, traveling, etc. My first priority when I was choosing a "hunting" dog was family pet 1st and champion hunter second. Just like raising kids and coaching employees, you want to put the work in to setting your dog up for success. That is why I love this forum. I get to gather information from the wealth of knowledge and apply what I choose to apply. At the end of the day, my "hunting" dog is right there with me for better or worse. That is what satisfies me the most. Secondly is seeing him work and be success and hopefully be part of that. I interrupt his thoughts nearly the same. Even though he gets the most jazzed up to hunt, his first priority other than food is to be with me. I know this because when hunting he comes back to check with me regularly. If his first priority was to hunt, then he would be gone and come back when he got hungry. That is what I find so neat about working dogs. They are bred to serve a useful purpose and have different degrees of pack socialization. I do find it sad that many hunting breeds have and are becoming more difficult to find good hunting instincts. I just hope that responsible "hunters" do not breed dogs that do not hunt or display undesirable traits. I would hope that breeding be left to the few that truly are improving the breeds. I am not one of those professionals. I am just one of the owners.
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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby Kiger2 » Wed Jan 25, 2017 10:15 pm

Overit2,

Good for you for putting this much effort into your pup.

My primary advice, since you have a fiancee, is to learn as much as you can now. When you have kids, you priorities may change. the education you get now, will serve you and future hounds well. good luck!
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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby aaronk » Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:53 pm

I find it interesting that people that don't hunt (and never have) proclaim that their hunting dog is content and happy with going hiking, running, playing fetch, pointing birds at the park, doing puzzle games, etc. when they have never seen how truly content and happy a dog is when it hunts. No comparison, not even close....
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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby 3drahthaars » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:06 am

aaronk wrote:I find it interesting that people that don't hunt (and never have) proclaim that their hunting dog is content and happy with going hiking, running, playing fetch, pointing birds at the park, doing puzzle games, etc. when they have never seen how truly content and happy a dog is when it hunts. No comparison, not even close....


X2

You see the difference!

Run a hunting dog in a relatively sterile area like a park, THEN run the same dog in an area that has wild game, and the tail will tell you...

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Re: Versatile dogs for everything but hunting...

Postby overit2 » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:50 am

Kiger2 wrote:Overit2,

Good for you for putting this much effort into your pup.

My primary advice, since you have a fiancee, is to learn as much as you can now. When you have kids, you priorities may change. the education you get now, will serve you and future hounds well. good luck!


Luckily him and I have time to dedicate to our dog-this is both our 2nd marriage and our kids (my 2 sons his daughter) are all teens and a couple years from finishing HS-we've been together over 8 years now. They have no TIME for us old farts lol- I think in part we got him because we wanted a new one to baby and have fun and do our own thing with. Our kids are no longer enthusiastic about going to parks/camping/travelling with us, but we know he will be :)

Funny thing is all the attention/gifts he gets has sparked a bit of 'it's all about the dog w/you two' from our kids that normally don't care about our existence LOL. Crazy teens!
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