Blood toxicidity and oozing lesions

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Blood toxicidity and oozing lesions

Postby Country-Side Breeders » Fri Dec 19, 2003 2:58 pm

Here's one for you to figure out:

A buddy of mine has a lab that was playing with her retrieve dummy (the one with the handle on the other end of it). She klunked herself up top the head and gave herself a concusion. She went to the vet, was watched and then developed pussing lesions throughout her body. The vet told her that it was from the toxins in her blood from the injury and gave her some steriod injections to help kick start the liver. She has started walking again and it still getting hand fed, but the lesions are still forming and she isn't doing any better on that respect. Any suggestions as to helping her or any thoughts/experiences on anything like the sort? I've been doing some research on it but so far haven't come up with anything. I thought maybe some of you would have some options.
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Postby Hank » Fri Dec 19, 2003 5:08 pm

"The vet told her that it was from the toxins in her blood from the injury and gave her some steriod injections to help kick start the liver."

I'm no Veterinarian but I do know something about biology and disease and that is about the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard. It sounds to me as though the dog picked up a bacterial or viral infection while at the Vet's and now the Vet is trying to cover his or her butt. Unless the dog's clunk on the head resulted in an open wound that became infected (hence the toxin explanation), there is no way that sort of injury is going to result in oozing sores. I have a feeling the Vet knows exactly what it is and isn't admitting it. The fact that he's giving the dog steriod injections instead of antibiotics leads me to believe he suspects a viral infection. I would call another Vet for a second opinion right away.
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Postby Country-Side Breeders » Fri Dec 19, 2003 6:17 pm

From what I understand, the clunk damaged the brain(I know, is the concusion), which did damage to the liver, causing the toxins in the liver to get into the blood stream. What I don't understand is how the toxins are coming out through the skin.
Patty Lemke
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Postby Hank » Sat Dec 20, 2003 12:52 am

While it is true the liver is responsible for clearing toxins from the blood stream, those toxins don't simply remain in the liver ad infinitum. They are metabolized, broken down, and secreted back into the blood stream where the by products are cleared from the blood by the kidneys. I fail to see how a minor brain injury can interupt this cycle short of causing death. Brain dead individuals often have perfectly functioning internal organs, including the liver, which is why they have organ donor cards. This Vet is either blowing smoke up your keester or a complete idiot. Either way, you'd be best off trying somebody else. If you live in an area with a Vet college nearby, that would also be a thought. They often have specialists there you can't find anywhere else. I'd bet my eye teeth the dog has a severe infection he picked up at the Vet Hospital. It happens all the time with both animals and people.

The following web site gives a general overview of liver disease and it's symptoms in dogs:

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm ... icleid=315

Notice there is no mention of oozing sores on the skin. However, there are simple blood tests that can be performed to verify whether or not the dogs liver is functioning properly. If the Vet hasn't performed these tests to prove the dog is suffering from a liver disfunction, then he is either lying to you or he got his degree out of a cereal box.

Another possibility you might consider is mange. If the skin sores are surrounded by flaking skin, that could also be the explanation. If the Vet recently boarded a dog with mange, the mites could have easily transfered to your buddies lab. If that is the case, you can do skin scrapes to look for the mite but they are often hard to find. A couple of injections of ivermectin at high doses over a several week period will clear mange up pretty quickly.
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Postby Deb » Mon Dec 22, 2003 6:50 pm

It's rare but there is an auto-immune skin disease dogs can get called Pemphagus. The dog develops sores, usually they start on the feet then move to the rest of the body. The dog needs to be seen by a dermatologist to get the correct treatment. The sores usually don't heal on their own and if left untreated the dog will die from this.
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